Tag Results

Chasing the Virus

As we continue to get back to functioning in the ‘new normal’, we wanted to bring your attention to the situation on ground and share some insights based on facts that belie our growing sense of relief and inclination to now look beyond the virus.

Although we are witnessing a reduction of active COVID-19 cases in metro cities, the fight against COVID-19 is far from over as it spreads in the smaller districts. We have published a research report, Chasing the Virus, to help you make an informed decision on where you can make the most impact with your support in the fight against COVID-19.

Read the full report – bit.ly/chasingthevirus

Solutions for a Pandemic

We can’t have everything. Firing up the economy is a priority, but so is controlling the spread of the disease. Businesses have challenges and need to be rescued, but not at the cost of our workers. Indian corporates are posed with an enormous opportunity to intervene. Corporates today stand at a crucial juncture and have a chance to serve the supply chain, implored businesses, the last producers and aid them in collectivisation, help them with technology, enhanced productivity trainings and more.

While navigating the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on the economy, industry and society, Samhita Social Ventures and IDFC Institute co-hosted  ‘Leaders with Purpose’ — a webinar series aimed at exploring how Samaj, Sarkar and Bazaar can come together at this unprecedented time and reimagine solutions to benefit both business and the socio-economically vulnerable.

Speakers:

Discussion facilitated by Dr. Nachiket Mor with:

Prof. Esther Duflo, Nobel Laureate, MIT Professor and Director, J-PAL

Sanjiv Mehta, Chairman & Managing Director, Hindustan Unilever Ltd

Nisaba Godrej, Chairperson Godrej Consumer Products

Dr. Rukmini Banerji, CEO, Pratham

Renana Jhabvala, National Co-ordinator, SEWA

Dr. Esther Duflo said, in our first webinar,  that it is essential for government, business, and NGO stakeholders to focus on cash transfers to economically vulnerable populations to avoid entering into a “society-wide poverty trap” in India. Dr. Duflo said “this is something business should be keenly interested in and very much behind it, not just because it’s the right thing to do morally, but also because I think it is the most responsible thing to do economically…self-interested business should be very much lobbying for this cash transfer.”

“We have – both Abhijit Banerjee and I – really insisted on the need for the government to act quickly and swiftly to prevent a lot of people who are not ultra-poor but merely poor, or maybe not even poor…to avoid those people to completely collapse back in a situation where it would be much harder to get out,” Dr. Duflo said of her own and fellow Nobel laureate’s views. “That in a sense is something that would affect them personally – an individual poverty trap – but can also create society-wide poverty traps.”

Ms. Renana Jhabvala reiterated Ms. Duflo’s recommendation of DBTs (Direct Benefit Transfers) as an effective way to promote wellbeing and resilience in low-income communities, and remarked on the importance of strengthening the systems through which the funds can be accessed. SEWA’s research has shown that the poorest really benefit from regular cash transfers, not very large, that come at regular intervals, and can transform lives completely. Largest experiment in MP showed this – bottom 25% really benefited. “We went back 5 years after 1 year of cash transfers, and we found the effects were still lingering, and they were still as well of due to that one year… This has come out so clearly in this crisis – if we’d had a way to transfer a certain minimum to every person who needed it, or below a certain income level, it would make a huge huge difference in their lives.”

In lieu of the crisis, Ms. Jhabvala made an extra plea on the need of a real coordination among corporates, NGOs, and government to usher into larger benefit of the society. Other cohorts of vulnerability, the elderly, widows, single mother who can not access support all need to be identified.  “In just a few days, we reached 70,000 people because of this coordination, and if it can continue, it could make a huge difference.”

The webinar session saw all panelists collectively stressing the importance of effective multi-stakeholder collaboration and cooperation to ensure last-mile service delivery to those most at risk. Ms. Nisaba Godrej and Mr. Sanjiv Mehta remarked on the importance of business leaders considering the safety and security of workers in manufacturing and distribution networks, and working in tandem with NGOs to identify and deliver support to the most vulnerable communities.

Mr. Mehta of HUL, encouraged Indian companies and iterated HUL’s  inclusion of its networks in their circle of influence and responsibility. The safety measures implemented in HUL’s factories, have been rolled out to their entire supply chains. It also goes beyond manufacturing – HUL distributes to households, to 95% of the households across society. Mr. Mehta laid emphasis on the need to train even retailers, and highlighted HUL’s. Suraksha programme which gives them guidance on how to operate safely.

Dr. Duflo commented on the opportunity the pandemic has presented to rethink and transform India’s education system, and the importance of not rushing back to pick up curriculum where it was left off. Dr. Rukmini Banerji echoed this, saying “there should be no rush…into the curriculum; we need to spend this time to really build our foundations again…most Indian children needed this building of the basic reading, basic arithmetic – and let’s take our time to do that.” She also stressed that though schools have been closed, children have been learning a lot about how to manage crises and scarcity by watching their families and communities’ reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic, and that adults should “need to spend time in learning from children what they have learned so that we can then build on that.”

The key takeaways of the webinar are available over here.

The full recording of the webinar is available at http://bit.ly/LeadersWithPurpose

For more information, please contact csr[at]samhita.org

– Ahana Singh Rathore

Looking Back to Look Forward

It’s been five years since India became the first country in the world to mandate Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) spending for eligible companies, generating a lot of local discussions, national debates and global curiosity.

Did the companies comply? How did they perform? How were the CSR funds spent and on what? Did the NGO sector benefit? What next for CSR?

We answer some of these questions here, based on the most comprehensive CSR dataset compiled so far by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs1 and our own experience with 100+ companies.

1. Compliance with CSR Act has been decent, with room for improvement

For a regulation that is only 5 years old, required companies to step outside their comfort zone and have a steep learning curve, the compliance has been good, with definite scope of improvement.

Compliance can be measured using two indicators – number of companies reporting on CSR and number of companies spending the stipulated amount.

  • On average, the reporting rate among eligible companies in the last 4 years has been 64%.
  • Companies spent 68% of the prescribed CSR amount in the last four years, totaling to ~INR 52,000 crore.
  • Of the liable and reporting companies, the proportion spending zero amount has reduced over the years, consequentially, increasing the number of companies that actually do spend on CSR activities. In fact, the proportion spending exact or more than prescribed amount has increased from 26% in 14-15 to 44% in 17-18.

CSR Spend Analysis

Data pertaining to CSR expenditure in FY 2017-18 is still being gathered by MCA through the filings made by companies and the numbers are likely to improve as more companies file their data.

2. The 80-20 rule

In 17-18, 289 companies spent INR 7,067 crore on CSR – even though these accounted for only 2% of liable and reporting companies, their cumulative spend amounted to 53% of the total spend on CSR in that year.

Many of these companies have adopted a strategic, systematic and structured approach to CSR, with the intent to maximize social impact. For instance, a majority of the BSE 100 companies, which are India’s largest companies by market cap, have created suitable internal governance structure to execute CSR, with 24% having their own foundation and 52% having dedicated CSR departments.

However, these companies also saw the highest gap between prescribed and spent CSR amounts, in absolute terms. If these companies can be further nudged and supported to spend their entire prescribed CSR amounts, and in more meaningful ways, we will not only be able to unlock a huge amount of capital for the development sector, but also significantly improve the quality of that capital.

3. Companies do not prefer writing cheques to government funds

CSR towards government funds such as Swachh Bharat Kosh, Clean Ganga Fund and Prime Minister’s Relief Fund collectively accounted for just 5% of the total CSR spend over 14-15 to 17-18. This signals to an underlying trend that companies are not merely looking to offload their CSR funds to simply comply with the Act, but are seeking opportunities to create deeper social impact by taking a more hands-on role.

4. CSR’s preference for education and health continues to leave out other causes

Education accounted for 30% of total CSR spending between 14-15 and 17-18. Healthcare was the second most popular cause, receiving 17% of funds, followed by rural development at 10%. On the other hand, women empowerment received 1%, training to promote sports received 1% and technology incubators received 0.13%.

5. Need vs. flow

CSR is benefitting states with relatively higher level of development. Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu and Delhi received 40% of the total CSR expenditure from 2014-15 to 2017-18, even though they account for 11% of total number of aspirational districts. On the other hand, Jharkhand, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh account for 58% of total number of aspirational districts, yet received only 9% of the total expenditure towards CSR.

This bias continues within a state as well. An analysis of data for FY 16-17 shows that even in Maharashtra, which received the largest volume of funding, certain districts such as Pune and Mumbai (suburban) received the highest amount in CSR funding (more than INR 200 crore each), while those which were farther away from industrialized areas such as Hingoli, Buldhana and Parbhani received less than INR 1 crore of funding.

Aspirational Districts Statewise data
6. Local area spending becomes a double-edged sword

Subsection 5 of Section 135 encourages companies to give preference to the areas around where they operate, for spending the amount earmarked for CSR activities. CSR spending in local areas has accounted for a little more than half of the total CSR spend in the last two years.

This has had positive and negative ramifications. On the bright side, companies with manufacturing operations in remote parts of the country are investing in communities around them and working with smaller, local NGOs in doing so. But, by the same logic, significant CSR funds are being concentrating into small areas, leaving out surrounding areas with high needs but outside the subjective definitions of ‘local area’.

Share of local area expenditure

7. CSR’s promise for the NGO sector yet to be fully unlocked

While a substantial proportion of companies spend their CSR funds directly, implying through vendors or service providers that are not not-for-profit in nature, NGOs are becoming the most popular route for companies to execute their CSR activities. 43% of all CSR funds in the last four years was spent through supporting NGOs with grants.

However, not all NGOs have been able to tap into this opportunity. An NGO survey2 conducted by Samhita, in association with the ATE Foundation, in 2019 revealed that 1 out of 2 NGOs had not received CSR funds in the last one year. Lack of information on corporate opportunities, absence of an understanding to deal with CSR requirements and NGO’s location were the top three challenges reported by NGOs in accessing CSR.

CSR Spend Channel

What next for CSR?

A. From compliance to strategic to catalytic

Many companies have graduated from compliance-oriented CSR to strategic CSR, to now thinking of being catalytic.

Catalytic CSR is defined by its ability to:

  • Unlock more resources and generate leverage by seeding the flow of risk capital (philanthropic or commercial)
  • Address market failures or inefficiencies in an ecosystem
  • Reduce transaction costs and information asymmetry between various actors
  • Introduce new stakeholders to the ecosystem and leverage their competencies

B. Emphasis on flagship programs

The desire to be strategic has encouraged companies to play a proactive and hands-on role in their CSR programs. More and more companies want to co-create ‘flagship’ programs that leverage their business strengths in meaningfully addressing a social issue and differentiate them in the sector. Flagship CSR programs are great since they bring more corporate ownership, significant resources, innovative thinking, long-term commitment and a comprehensive approach. However, they may also lead to higher expectations around performance, systems and processes from the NGO partners executing such programs.

C. Data-driven decisions and evidence-backed interventions

CSR has emphasized strong M&E systems from the get-go. Many companies base their decisions to fund, scale or exit based on data and evidence generated through process and outcome evaluations. In a further impetus, the High Level Committee on CSR, constituted by the MCA, has suggested that companies with CSR budgets of INR 5 crore or more invest in impact evaluations at least once on three years. Further, with the recognition of Nobel Laureate Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Micheal Kremer’s work regarding experimental approach to alleviating global poverty3 wherein rigorous evidence is used to inform policy, CSR may move towards not only funding and scaling evidence-backed interventions, but also improving the quality of their own impact assessments.

D. Rising interest in innovative financial instruments

India has witnessed a lot of traction in the use of innovative financial instruments in the social and development sector. A prominent example of this was the launch of the world’s first development impact bond in India which focused on the learning and enrollment outcomes for out-of-school girls.4 These trends coupled with the proposed institutionalization of a social stock exchange in India, as declared by Nirmala Sitharaman in her maiden budget speech5, has the potential to drive companies to invest in innovative financial instruments such as development impact bonds, social success notes, loan guarantee funds etc.

E. Brands with purpose – moving beyond CSR

Companies have started moving from CSR to a broader narrative of responsible corporate citizenship, of which CSR is just one part that talks about responsibility to external communities and environment. The other part of the narrative is sustainable and responsible internal business practices in supply chains, production, distribution etc. This trend is being driven by two factors –

  • A growing interest and awareness of ESG (environmental, social and corporate governance) factors among investors in India
  • A growing conscious consumer movement that is building pressure on companies to respond to ethical and environmental issues that matter to them

Conclusion

The CSR mandate helped place companies as active stakeholders in the social sector. While the magnitude of efforts and resources mobilized from the companies by the mandate has been profound, we still have a long way to go in terms of unlocking CSR’s true potential. The trends observed show that we are on the right path, but it will take efforts from all stakeholders, not just companies, to ensure that CSR can live up to its promise of invigorating the sector and building the nation.

The above article is authored by two Samhita team members: Anushree Parekh, Director – Research and Knowledge and Shivina Jagtiani, Assistant Manager – Strategic Initiatives.

New Frontiers in CSR

India has been at the forefront of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) paradigm, much before the introduction of Section 135 of Companies Act, 2013, which made CSR a regulatory requirement.

As per data filed by companies on the Ministry of Corporate Affairs portal, around 20,000 companies had reported spending on CSR, with total spend amounting to INR 13,465 Cr in 16-17. Total public expenditure in 16-17 on agriculture and farmers’ welfare, rural sector and social sector (including education, healthcare, skills) was estimated at Rs 9,84,000 crores. The CSR spend that year was Rs.13,465 Cr. – 1.36% of the public spending.

If CSR’s monetary contribution is less than a fraction of what the government is earmarking for the nation’s growth, then, in what capacity can CSR optimize its contributions towards sustainable development? How can companies catalyze innovation and creativity to maximize scalable impact, stretch CSR budgets further and move the needle?

To deliver on the promise of reinvigorating the development sector, the very nature of how companies implement CSR needs to evolve: from inputs to outcomes, from individual to ecosystem, and from delivering services to building capacity and enabling the market.

In other words, companies need to evolve from Compliance-driven CSR 🡪 Strategic CSR 🡪 Catalytic CSR.  This report explains different models under catalytic and takes a case study approach to demonstrate its execution, effectiveness and ability to amplify impact.

Click here to download the report.

[Forebes India] The changing landscape of CSR in India

It’s been a little over a year since the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) law came into effect on April 1, 2014. Within such a short period, the entire landscape of CSR in India has taken a radical flight. Discussions over the long term CSR vision and trends with new breed of  leaders in the corporate landscape lead to some interesting findings.

Click here to read the article.

Workshop on Corporate Fundraising

Dates: November 14-15, 2014

Location: Bangalore

Resource Alliance brings to you a Game Changing Workshop that will guide you step by step to reach corporates and create partnerships.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Understand CSR and details of Companies Act 2013 as applicable to NGOs.
  2. Initiate Corporate Fundraising including CSR funds in their organizations.
  3. Articulate the same with SMT/Board
  4. Design a program to build up with Corporates.
  5. Understand nuances of the Dialogue with Corporates.
  6. Create Partnerships for a Win-Win situation.

This 2 day workshop will apprise participants with knowledge, skills and different techniques in the above mentioned topics – enough to get into action!

To register, kindly email your name, designation, name of your organization following details to ja[email protected].

Tapping into CSR funds – Pune

The need Register Today

With the Companies Act 2013 mandating Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for companies in India, the social sector holds the potential to transform and expand. Increased corporate engagement in India’s social development arena paves the way for opportunities of collaboration between companies and social organizations (primarily comprising of NGOs and Social Enterprises).

Companies, starting June 2014, will have allocated CSR funds to support programs undertaken by social organizations. However, this would require social organizations to effectively conduct outreach, corporate engagement, and understand the nature of a strategic and sustainable partnership in order to establish and implement large-scale, impactful social interventions.

The offering

Having successfully undertaken CSR projects and events with a wide network of NGOs and SEs, as well as facilitating partnerships between companies and social organizations, Samhita is well placed as the knowledge leader to effectively create a platform where both companies and social organizations can interact, grow and sustain, pushing evidence-based social impact at the forefront of strategic CSR.

Some of our past trainings and conferences include TechCamp Mumbai (in partnership with US Consulate Mumbai), TechCamp Bengaluru (in partnership with US Consulate Chennai), CSR in Healthcare (in partnership with USAID) and CSR in Education (in partnership with DFID). Samhita is also one of the learning and development partners of the Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs (affiliated with the Union Ministry of Corporate Affairs) and is taking an active role in norming and educating all key stakeholders of the Companies Act 2013.

The offering is a one-day capacity-building event that addresses the core needs of social organizations and equips them to better access companies and tap into CSR funding, while also giving companies the opportunity to interact and gain exposure to the work being done on the ground.

Objectives

  • Increase awareness among social organizations about the life cycle of corporate engagement and insights into nature of partnerships
  • Training social organizations for appropriate skills and resources for establishing and developing partnerships with companies and maintaining effective engagements with them
  • Create a platform for social organizations to understand objectives, model, existing infrastructure, organizational requirements, and functional structure of Companies and vice versa.
  • Record best practices and case studies from past successful social organization-corporate engagements
  • Provide an opportunity to social organizations to pitch programs, collect feedback from companies and potentially kick-start some dialogue that can lead to partnerships

Registration fees Register Today

  • Rs.5,000 (excl. taxes) per head

Note: You can avail of a 10% discount if more than one person from your organization is attending the event.
Note: Limited seats available. Registrations will be accepted on a first-come-first-served basis.

Proposed Agenda

09:00 – 09:30am Registration
09:30 – 10:30am Companies Act
10:30 – 11:15am Session I: Proposal writing & budgeting
11:15 – 11:30am Coffee and conversations
11:30 – 12:15 pm Session II: Monitoring & evaluation
12:15 – 12:45 pm Session III: Corporate interaction
12:45 – 01:30 pm Lunch
01:30 – 02:15 pm Session IV: Measuring impact
02:15 – 02:45 pm Session V: Communicating Impact
02:45 – 03:15 pm Session VI: Using technology effectively
03:15 – 03:30 pm Coffee and conversations
03:30 – 04:15 pm Session VII: Preparing a pitch
04:15 – 06:30 pm Networking with Companies

Tapping into CSR funds – Mumbai

The need Register Today

With the Companies Act 2013 mandating Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for companies in India, the social sector holds the potential to transform and expand. Increased corporate engagement in India’s social development arena paves the way for opportunities of collaboration between companies and social organizations (primarily comprising of NGOs and Social Enterprises).

Companies, starting June 2014, will have allocated CSR funds to support programs undertaken by social organizations. However, this would require social organizations to effectively conduct outreach, corporate engagement, and understand the nature of a strategic and sustainable partnership in order to establish and implement large-scale, impactful social interventions.

The offering

Having successfully undertaken CSR projects and events with a wide network of NGOs and SEs, as well as facilitating partnerships between companies and social organizations, Samhita is well placed as the knowledge leader to effectively create a platform where both companies and social organizations can interact, grow and sustain, pushing evidence-based social impact at the forefront of strategic CSR.

Some of our past trainings and conferences include TechCamp Mumbai (in partnership with US Consulate Mumbai), TechCamp Bengaluru (in partnership with US Consulate Chennai), CSR in Healthcare (in partnership with USAID) and CSR in Education (in partnership with DFID). Samhita is also one of the learning and development partners of the Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs (affiliated with the Union Ministry of Corporate Affairs) and is taking an active role in norming and educating all key stakeholders of the Companies Act 2013.

The offering is a one-day capacity-building event that addresses the core needs of social organizations and equips them to better access companies and tap into CSR funding, while also giving companies the opportunity to interact and gain exposure to the work being done on the ground.

Objectives

  • Increase awareness among social organizations about the life cycle of corporate engagement and insights into nature of partnerships
  • Training social organizations for appropriate skills and resources for establishing and developing partnerships with companies and maintaining effective engagements with them
  • Create a platform for social organizations to understand objectives, model, existing infrastructure, organizational requirements, and functional structure of Companies and vice versa.
  • Record best practices and case studies from past successful social organization-corporate engagements
  • Provide an opportunity to social organizations to pitch programs, collect feedback from companies and potentially kick-start some dialogue that can lead to partnerships

Registration fees

  • Rs.5,000 (excl. taxes) per head

 

Note: You can avail of a 10% discount if more than one person from your organization is attending the event.
Note: Limited seats available. Registrations will be accepted on a first-come-first-served basis.

Register Today

Proposed agenda

Training and sharing

08:30 – 09:00am: Registration
09:00 – 09:30am: Introductory Session: Primer of the Companies Act
09:30 – 10:00am: Session I: Accessing companies
10:00 – 10:30am: Session II: Models of effective partnerships between social organizations and companies
10:30 – 11:00pm: Session III: Writing Proposals
11:00 – 11:15am: Coffee and conversations
11:15 – 11:45pm: Session IV: Designing a Program
11:45 – 12:30pm: Session V: Co-Implementing Programs
12:30 – 01:15pm: Session VI: Measuring Impact
01:15 – 01:45pm: Lunch
01:45 – 02:30pm: Session VII: Communicating Impact
02:30 – 03:15pm: Session VIII: Engaging companies and employees in your programs
03:15 – 03:30pm: Coffee and conversations
03:30 – 05:00pm: Networking with Companies

Kaarmic Education Services – Bridge between education and employability

The Challenge

India has made progress in enrolling children in school but it has failed to deliver quality education. Thus, the next big challenge is bringing quality in education. Learning assessments show that children are not learning basics of literacy and numeracy. Almost 34% of students do not complete primary school (2010)[i] and about 80% never make it to college[ii] and those who remain in school receive low-quality instruction. A global study Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) ranked India nearly at the bottom in mathematics and reading skills underscoring the magnitude of the problem of quality of education[iii]. As a result, India faces significant shortages in skilled labour and individuals with minimum levels of cognitive skills and the public education system has struggled to meet this demand. India is banking on half its population being below the age of 25 for sustainable growth. We will be unable to reap the benefits of this demographic dividend unless we make investments to provide quality education and emphasize on learning outcomes that prepare young people with skills to be productively employed.

 

Kaarmic Education Services Private Limited (KESPL) and its Objective

KESPL is a social enterprise, which works with private educational institutes serving low -income communities to provide quality, affordable education and skill development programs in Hyderabad and Mumbai in order to bridge the employability gap and develop a more informed and skilled workforce for tomorrow’s India. The mission of KESPL is to build a more educated, empowered and employed India. It’s objectives are to create more industry aware graduates, help students with initial internship and industry experience to help them launch their careers, identify individual talent and promote them in the right direction, provide companies the opportunity to brand themselves in colleges and develop a connect between the corporate sector and the college ecosystem.

Through its products like “The Bridge Program” and the “School Development Program” it hopes to build a pool of educated, skilled and employable talent emerging from the low-income communities. It starts its intervention early, right from Grade 6 in schools and also works with students pursuing their Masters degree. Its work is dedicated to helping students understand their competencies, passions, industry realities and also helps them find the right employment. Its programs are conducted in educational institutes, ranging from slum schools to Tier 2 – Tier 3 colleges. In schools it provides affordable career guidance, effective teacher training to under qualified teachers and student development programs such as spoken English and computer literacy. In colleges it provides self-assessment tools to students, career specific student-industry interaction through events and online platform, specialized skills training as required by the industry, experience building opportunities and job placements. Experts from over 13 countries have helped design the curriculum for all its programs to match international standards.

 

The Bridge Program

Bridge is a unique workshop designed to fill the gap that exists between the young minds and businesses in India, with a vision to enhance the quality of employability. KESPL believes that this in turn would contribute towards the competitive advantage of our workforce in the global market and lead to the economic welfare of the nation as a whole. It is a career centric workshop designed in collaboration with industry specialists and HR professionals whose aim is to expose the youth to business realities with activities, discussions, and consultations.

 

Corporate Partnerships

KESPL partners with companies and industry professionals in a unique way through the India Employability Development Network (IEDN). This is an initiative by KESPL to create a network of successful entrepreneurs, corporate executives, and senior professionals who want to play an active role in contributing towards the knowledge building, mentoring and development of the future talent pool of India. Today, there are over 25 IEDN members who are part of the network.

This network of industry professionals have comprehensive knowledge about their respective industry, hiring needs, skill gaps and understanding about the Industry’s future potential and realities. IEDN members partner with KESPL to engage with its flagship product, The Bridge Program. The charter IEDN membership is by invitation only, and subject to the due process prescribed by the KESPL-IEDN regulations and bylaws. The membership is free for both organizations and individuals, as the objective is to engage as many supporters as possible in this nation building activity of solving the issue of urban unemployment.

 

Benefits to the Social Enterprise

 

Sustainability and Quality

IEDN members participate in at least 2 Bridge Sessions conducted in KESPL partner educational institutions every year. This ensures that parts of the resource requirements for the program are fulfilled and that the program is able to maintain the quality in terms of workshops in different schools. IEDN members provide support in mentoring, knowledge building and development of the unemployed youth of India in their desired capacity.

 

Fulfilling its mandate

Any program implemented by KEPSL can only be successful if the cycle is closed and the beneficiaries are able to actually obtain employment and that mandate is fulfilled by its partnership with IEDN.IEDN members also provide any opportunities if available for internship, permanent posting and other experience building programs to support worthy and talented students.

 

Increased Visibility

Partnering with an association of highly valued and respected corporates also enables KEPSL to build its brand and gain greater visibility for the work the organization is involved in.

 

Benefits to the Corporate Partners

Access to Talent Pool

The corporate partners have easy access to  the Future Talent Networks (FTN) present in KESPL’s various partner Universities/Colleges. Even more importantly, they have access to a pool of trained referred potential hires.  Freedom to promote products, services, organizations and opportunities in the FTNs of KESPL’s various partner Universities/Colleges.

 

Access to High Quality Networks

As members of IEDN, corporates have  access to the IEDN network of high net-worth individuals from various industries and all of KESPL’s networking events. This also in turn enables these corporates to potential build other partnerships and therefore explore new territories and build in scale.

 

Ability to ensure social impact

All of the corporate organizations within the IEDN network are able to directly work with young people from low income communities and  impact their lives through creating career awareness. This therefore enables them to play their part in eradicating urban unemployment and building India’s future talent pool.

 

Conclusion

The partnership between Kaarmic Education Services and IEDN is an extremely unique one since it is an example of collaboration between a social enterprise and a network of individuals and corporates. This partnership is also exemplary of a mutually beneficial alliance since both parties are gaining from each others’ network. Apart from fulfilling CSR mandates through engaging with young people from low income communities and there by playing a part in reducing urban unemployment, the network is also  able to tap into the pool for recruitment purposes, thereby increasing their stake and creating incentives for them as well.

 

 



[i] Tilak, B.G.J. (2010). Tangible targets at school. The Hindu. 11th February 2010. [online] Available at : < http://www.hindu.com/2010/02/11/stories/2010021150390800.htm>

[ii] Times of India (2012). Gross Enrolment at nearly 19% shows survey. Times of India. 29th September 2012. New Delhi. [online] Available at :< http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-09-29/news/34163129_1_ger-sc-students-total-student-enrollment>

[iii] Chhapia, H. (2012) Indian students rank 2nd last in global test – The Times of India. [online] Available at: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/education/news/Indian-students-rank-2nd-last-in-global-test/articleshow/11492508.cms

Request for Proposals from NGOs working for women’s hygiene in Saran district, Bihar

Deadline: June 20, 2014

A multinational company manufacturing sanitary napkins for women and healthcare products for infants is looking to reach out to villages in Saran district of Bihar for selling these products in rural households. They are looking to partner with social organizations operating in Saran, who can send their women employees to different rural households for spreading awareness on menstrual hygiene & infant health, and also sell these products to the rural women. The social organization will be compensated with a margin for each product sold.

Eligibility Criteria

  • The organization must be located in Saran or Patna, Bihar
  • The organization must be working in the field of women’s health/hygiene or women empowerment
  • The organization must have considerable number of women employees
  • The organization must be in operation for a minimum period of 1 year from the date of registration
  • The organization must be registered as a non-profit that implements social development projects in India, with no religious or political affiliations
  • The organization’s physical address provided must be verifiable
  • The organization must have a valid 80G and 12A certification
  • The organization must have an Executive Board that maintains budgets, annual activity reports and audited financial statements. These yearly records must be available and submitted upon request
  • The organization must fully comply with local and central government regulations and labor laws
To apply for the RFP, please visit the link